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Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

The earliest known documentation of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (NA) dates to Hippocrates in the fifth century B.C. Commonly referred to as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA), it is also known as juvenile angiofibroma (JAF), or fibromatous or angiofibromatous hamartoma of the nasal cavity Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are rare tumors that occur almost exclusively among adolescent males. They are benign, locally invasive tumors with a strong tendency to recur. Surgical resection, when possible, is considered the treatment of choice Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign vascular tumor that appears in the nasal cavity. Although it is non-malignant (not cancerous), it can expand quickly and extensively

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also known as juvenile nasal angiofibroma, is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor of the nasopharynx that arises from the superior margin of the sphenopalatine foramen and grows in the back of the nasal cavity Angiofibroma is a benign (noncancerous) nasal cavity tumor that almost exclusively affects adolescent boys. It also may be referred to as juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). The age range for this disease is 7 to 19 years old, with most people being diagnosed between 10 and 19 years old

The juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign neoplasm of the posterior nasopharynx. It occurs almost exclusively in adolescent males, with an average age at diagnosis of 15 years old Epidemiology. 0.05 - 0.5% of all head and neck tumors ( StatPearls: Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma [Accessed 10 June 2020] ) Occurs almost exclusively in adolescent and young males, with a median age of diagnosis of 15 years (range: 8 - 27 years) ( Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp 2019;70:279, Head Neck Pathol 2018;12:52 Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a tumor that grows behind the nose. Although it is a benign tumor (not cancerous), it is aggressive and serious. It can spread from the nasal cavity to the sinuses, eye socket, skull and brain. The nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tumor is made mostly of blood vessels, which can result in frequent nosebleeds Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are a rare benign, but locally aggressive, vascular tumors that occur almost exclusively in young men. On imaging, they present as a vividly enhancing soft-tissue masses centered on the sphenopalatine foramen. Given its vascularity, prominent flow voids are seen on MRI leading to a salt and pepper appearance Nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (NA) are rare tumor-like lesions characterized by architecturally irregular vessels set in a fibrous stroma

sopharyngeal angiofibroma was 25 times more fre- quent in our patient population with familial adenoma- tous polyposis than in an age-matched hospital population. The association of these two rare condi- tions suggests that nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is an extracolonic manifestation of adenomatous pol- yposis What is a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA)? Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA), while rare, is the most common benign tumor of the space at the back of the nasal cavity that connects the nose to the mouth. This space is called the nasopharynx

Treatments for Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. What are the treatment options for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma? First line therapy is usually surgery, with the goal of removing as much of the tumor as possible. Ideally the entire tumor is removed. In some situations, depending on where the tumor has spread, complete removal may. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is an uncommon, slow-growing, benign but locally invasive vascular tumor arising from tissues in the sphenopalatine foramen inside the nasal cavity. JNAs are also reported to arise from the posterior aspect of the middle turbinate and rarely from other sites of the nasal cavity and in paranasal sinuses OBJECTIVES: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a highly vascular and locally invasive tumor with a high incidence of persistence and recurrence. The classical treatment of this tumor is surgery and/or radiotherapy. Use of endoscopic techniques seems to be on the rise in treatment of these lesions Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma are benign neoplasm consisting of vascular and fibrous tissue. The resected angiofibroma as shown here is a large, single, sessile, red-pinkish mass that previously occupied the nasopharynx. Angiofibromas can also be pedunculated or polypoid

Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma - PubMe

  1. angiofibroma is a rare, benign, but locally aggressive tumor of the nasopharynx. It is composed of vascular and fibrous tissue
  2. Schuon et al reported on the immunohistochemical analysis of growth mechanisms in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. [ 6] They concluded that juvenile angiofibroma (JNA) growth and..
  3. Practice Essentials Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign tumor that tends to bleed and occurs in the nasopharynx of prepubertal and adolescent males. [ 1, 2] Workup in juvenile..
  4. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare highly vascular tumor within the posterior nasal cavity found almost exclusively in adolescent boys. This activity reviews the evaluation and treatment of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and explains the role of the an interprofessional team in evaluating and treating patients with this condition
  5. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the exclusive endoscopic treatment of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in the literature to define the clinical features in terms of staging and the treatment outcomes in terms of bleeding, recurrence, residual tumor, and complications. DATA SOURCES: Online databases, including PubMed and EMBASE, were used
  6. Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma High Quality Pathology Images of Head & Neck: Nose & Sinuses of Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

Thirty-two cases of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, including 2 recurrences, all of which had been excised from males between 7 and 25 years, were subjected to systematic immunohistochemical study. Most of the tumour vessels, which lacked elastic laminae, were characterized by vascular walls of irregular thickness and variable muscle content. In places endothelial cells were only separated from. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: (A nine-year experience) - Volume 102 Issue Case Discussion. This is a classical presentation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.This is a histologically benign lesion with very aggressive local behavior. It is almost exclusively encountered in adolescent males 1.The most common presenting symptom is painless nasal obstruction or epistaxis; however, other symptoms may develop depending on the size and extent of the tumor mass

Discussion. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is an uncommon, benign, fibrovascular tumor which exhibits a distinct predilection for adolescent males and accounts for less than 1% of all head and neck neoplasms [1, 2].Given the strict epidemiology, hormonal influences seem likely as investigators have revealed the presence of androgen, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone receptors [3, 4] and lack. Introduction Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a histopathologically benign and highly vascular tumour of the nasopharynx that develops primarily in adolescent males

鼻咽纤维血管瘤(nasopharyngeal angiofibroma)又称为青少年出血性纤维瘤,多见于10~25岁男性。临床症状以进行性鼻塞和反复顽 Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) is a relatively rare tumor of the nasopharynx, comprising only 0.5% of all head and neck tumors. These tumors are benign, however they are locally invasive. In the general population, JNA occurs at an incidence of roughly 1:150,000, however JNA predominately appears in males age 14-25

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. H&E stain. LM. fibroblastic cells with plump (near cuboidal) nuclei, fibrous stroma, abundant capillaries. Site. head and neck - nasopharynx. Clinical history. male, adolescents young to adults, frequent nose bleeds. Prevalence What Is Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA)? JNA's are well-vascularized benign lesions typically occurring in adolescent males between the ages of 7-19 years old. The most common symptom of JNA's is nose bleeds and/or nasal obstruction. Additionally, patients may experience headaches, facial swelling, nasal discharge, decreased or.

Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma - an overview ScienceDirect

Angiofibroma juvenil - EcuRed

Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Boston Children's

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor of the nasopharynx that arises from the superior margin of the sphenopalatine foramen and grows in the back of the nasal cavity. It most commonly affects adolescent males (because it is a hormone-sensitive tumor). Though it is a benign tumor, it is locally invasive and can invade the nose, cheek, orbit. A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a noncancerous tumor made up of blood vessels that grow at the back of the nose. Typically, these tumors occur in teenage boys. They often grow quickly during puberty, then slow down or stop growing entirely after adolescence Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign but locally invasive tumor accounting for about 0.05% of all head and neck tumors. Patients usually present with nasal obstruction and epistaxis. The tumor can however be extensive on presentation with intra orbital and intra cranial extension Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare, benign, highly vascular, and locally aggressive tumor that predominantly occurs in adolescent males. Usually, the presenting symptom is a painless nasal obstruction or epistaxis; however, other symptoms may develop depending on the size and extent of the tumor mass Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign, vascular, and locally aggressive tumor that arises in the nasal cavity, extending into the nasopharynx and often in [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Neoplasm of Nasal Cavity. angiofibroma), neurogenic.

Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) remains one of the most enigmatic tumors encountered by laryngotologists-head neck surgeons. Its origin at a particular age in a particular sex has intrigued many. Histopathologically benign, JNAs are locally aggressive tumors with tendency to cause massive recurrent nasal bleeds. While surgery remains the gold standard treatment, a paradigm shift. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is a rare tumor. The tumor is considered rare, because only 0.05% of all head and neck tumors are Juvenile Angiofibromas. JNA is almost exclusively seen in males (adolescent boys) in the age range 7-19 years. The tumor is hardly known to occur in females NASOPHARYNGEAL ANGIOFIBROMA : STAGING AND MANAGEMENT - A REVIEW OF THE CASE SERIES REPORT A b h a y S i n h a ~, Savitri G u p t a 2 Key Words : Juvenile angiofibroma, staging, surgical approach. INTRODUCTION Juvenile angiofibroma also known as nasaopharyngeal All the patients underwent a complete otorhinolaryngologic angiofibroma, juvenile. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma. Article Translations: What Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a growth in the area behind the nose. These growths are benign (not cancer), but can damage nerves and bones and block ear and sinus drainage. Almost all JNAs are in teenage boys

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma - Wikipedi

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a relatively uncommon tumor of adolescence which is usually manifested by massive nosebleeds and nasal obstruction. In addition to its usefulness in the diagnosis of this entity, arteriography also has therapeutic implications. From a series of 5 cases studied arteriographically, 2 will be reported in some detail to illustrate these points Juvenile angiofibroma is the most common benign nasopharyngeal tumor; nevertheless, it is uncommon and accounts for only 0.05% of all head and neck neoplasms. An incidence of 1:5000 to 1:60,000 in otolaryngology patients has been reported. This tumor was described by Hippocrates, but the term angiofibroma was first used by Friedberg in 1940 to. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Ashish k.Gupta SMS medical college Jaipur 2. Introduction Juvenile angiofibroma is an uncommon, benign and extremely vascular tumour 3. History Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma has been documented since the time of Hippocrates (4 BC). Infact Hippocrates goes on to describe a polyp in the nose which. Lecture series in Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck SurgeryThese video lecture notes are for undergraduate students and may be of some help in revision to pos..

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma | Image | Radiopaedia

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a vascular tumor of the nasopharynx. Our aim is to analyze prognostic factors, report results obtained with radiation therapy and propose a staging system. Materials and Methods. Retrospective study of patients with JNA Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) Anatomy: the Pterygopalatine Fossa and Surrounding Structures. return to: Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma see also: Juvenile Angiofibroma - Rads JNA tumors most commonly originate from the sphenopalatine foramen or vidian canal, which are located at the medial or posterior border of the pterygopalatine fossa, respectively

Showing results for Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Pathology of head and neck neoplasms View in Chinese along with its diagnosis, staging, and treatment, is discussed separately Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNA) are rare tumors exclusively seen in adolescent males, presenting with epistaxis. Learn about the risk factors for nasopharyngeal cancer and what you might be able to do to help lower your risk. Nasopharyngeal Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What patients and caregivers need to know about cancer, coronavirus, and COVID-19 Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is a benign tumour consists of fibrous tissue with a variable proportion of vascular tissues occur in the nasopharynx of mainly prepubertal and adolescent male. At first Hippocrates described this tumour in the 5th century BC but Friedberg first used the term Angiofibroma in 1940

Angiofibroma (Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma) - UPM

A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a growth in the area behind the nose. These growths are benign (not cancer), but can damage nerves and bones and block ear and sinus drainage. Almost all JNAs are in teenage boys The (JNA) juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare neoplasm, of benign histology, that affects almost exclusively male sex adolescent individuals. It corresponds to 0,05% of all head and neck tumors and is, however, the most common nasopharynx benign tumor (1,2). The JNA is a highly vascularized tumor and its probable original site is in. Angiofibroma. Solitary cutaneous angiofibroma may also be called fibrous papule or perifollicular fibroma, is a term used to define a group of lesions with different clinical presentations but with the same histologic findings 1).Cutaneous angiofibromas are benign fibrous neoplasms comprised of a proliferation of stellate and spindled cells, thin-walled blood vessels with dilated lumina in the. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign, highly vascular, fibrous tumor originating in the nasopharynx of young boys and reputed to undergo spontaneous regression at puberty (5). Angiography has shown clearly that these tumors penetrate through normal fissures and foramina to extend into the regions adjacent to the nasopharynx Background: Nasopharyngeal angiofibromas are typically considered benign vascular neoplasms, with descriptions of high-grade sarcomatous change found only in lesions with prior radiotherapy. Methods and Results: We describe the first reported case of high-grade malignant change in a nasopharyngeal angiofibroma naive to radiation

Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Iowa Head and Neck

Pathology Outlines - Nasopharyngeal angiofibrom

  1. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, also called juvenile angiofibroma, is a benign, non-encapsulated, fibrovascular tumor, that grows very slowly. It is a common tumor of the nasopharynx, but represents only 0.05% of all head and neck neoplasms. The tumor has its onset in childhood with highest incidence in teenage males between 14 and 17 years old
  2. To describe a case of the rare complication of facial palsy following preoperative embolization of a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA). To illustrate the vascular supply to the facial nerve and as a result, highlight the etiology of the facial nerve palsy
  3. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning and MR imaging are valuable imaging modalities in the work-up of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) ().Basically, the tumor originates from the sphenopalatine foramen and involves both the pterygopalatine fossa and the posterior nasal cavity (2, 3).JNA develops through certain paths of extension (3-5), expanding by means of bony erosion and displacement.
  4. Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma presents with symptoms of nasal obstruction and epistaxis. The treatment of choice is embolization followed by surgery. A 52-year-old man underwent surgery for nasopharyngeal angiofibroma after adjuvant radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of angiofibroma with clinical follow-up after thermocoagulation.
  5. ants of JNA are limited by small sample size and inconsistent approaches. The purpose of this study is to exa
  6. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), or nasopharynx cancer, is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx, most commonly in the postero-lateral nasopharynx or pharyngeal recess (fossa of Rosenmüller), accounting for 50% of cases.NPC occurs in children and adults. NPC differs significantly from other cancers of the head and neck in its occurrence, causes, clinical behavior, and treatment

Preoperative endovascular embolization in treating patients with nasopharyngeal angiofibroma 血管 内 栓塞 在 鼻咽 血管 纤维 瘤 的 应用 168.160.184.82:808 Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Diagnosis certain. Assoc Prof Frank Gaillard. Published 15 May 2017. 78% complete. DSA (angiography) MRI. Case. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. Diagnosis probable. Dr Hani Makky Al Salam. Published 19 Sep 2010. 32% complete. CT DSA (angiography) Case

Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA

What is an angiofibroma? Benign tumor of nasal mucosa composed of large blood vessels + fibrous tissue, causes profuse epistaxis. What is nasopharyngeal carcinoma? Malignant tumour of nasopharyngeal epithelium -> EBV driven. What does biopsy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma show No Incisions, No Disfigurement and Faster Recovery Time. Learn More Today What is Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA)? JNA is a benign tumor (growth) of the nasal cavity that typically affects adolescent boys. Although it is non-cancerous, it can be grow to a significantly large size and expand itself from the nasal cavity into a variety of compartments in the head making it a challenging tumor to treat Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is the most common benign tumor of the nasopharynx, the space at the back of the nasal cavity that connects the nose to the mouth. These tumors tend to develop in young men between 10 and 25 years old. Androgen hormones can play a part in the growth of these tumors Epistaxis/Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) Overview. Nosebleeds (epistaxis) can occur for a variety of reasons. They may simply be due to dry weather or allergens in the environment. A more serious cause of nosebleeds is related to a tumor called a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA)

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Radiology Reference

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically and biologically benign tumor with aggressive behavior due to its location and associated symptoms including significant epistaxis and nasal obstruction (1-5). These tumors occur almost exclusively in male adolescents and account for 0.05%-0.5% of all head and neck tumors (1,5,6,7) Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma was 25 times more frequent in our patient population with familial adenomatous polyposis than in an age-matched hospital population. The association of these two rare conditions suggests that nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is an extracolonic manifestation of adenomatous polyposis

ANGIOFIBROMA NASOFARÍNGEO JUVENIL - ANGIOTAC - YouTube

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a locally aggressive benign vascular neoplasm, composed of vasogenic and myofibroblastic elements, accounts for 0.05-0.5% of all the head and neck neoplasms. There are very few case reports of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma involving the oral cavity Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma 420 INTRODUCTION Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) represents 0.05% to 0.5% of all head and neck tumors but is the common tumor of nasopharynx (1,2). It affects almost exclusively male adolescents. The median age at diag-nosis is 15 years (2-4). Histological benign appearance i Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (NA) is a benign, highly vascularised tumour of the nasopharynx, which typically occurs in young males aged 14-25 years. We report an interesting case of an NA arising de novo in a 32-year-old male. He was referred to our facility for severe nasal haemorrhage after biopsy of a left nasopharyngeal mass. In the operating room, extensive bleeding was noted, and an.

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: true neoplasm or vascular

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign vascular tumor, the etiology of which remains unknown [1]. It arises from the tissues around the sphenopalatine foramen. Although typically slow growing, the senonencapsulated tumors are locally aggressive, with the potential for intracranial or intraorbital extension. Advanced may reach. Jna (juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma) current treatment modalities. 1. JNA (Juvenile Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma) current treatment modalities and future considerations Presenter- Dr. Sritama De. 2. • Juvenile angiofibroma is an uncommon, benign and extremely vascular tumour that arises in the tissues within the sphenopalatine foramen Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma is a rare tumor in adolescent males. This book, the first of its kind devoted to the management of this tumor, is based on Dr N. Janakiram's paradigm shifting management technique for these highly vascular tumors Shikani AH, Richtsmeier WJ. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma tumor models. Failure of androgens to stimulate growth in nude mice and in vitro. Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery 118: 256-9; 1992. Weprin LS, Siemers PT. Spontaneous regression of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Definition:juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a histologically benign , but locally invasive neoplasm occurring almost exclusively in adolescent males. These tumors are highly aggressive and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to its tendency to bleed A series of cases including nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma are presented. Various ocular manifestations included proptosis, papilloedema, optic atrophy and cranial nerve palsies. Confirmation of diagnosis required a thorough ENT cheekup, like skiagraphy, computerized tomography, carotid angiography and ultrasonography.. juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma a benign tumor of the nasopharynx composed of fibrous connective tissue with abundant endothelium-lined vascular spaces, usually occurring during puberty in boys. Nasal obstruction may become total, with adenoid-type speech, discomfort in swallowing, obstruction of the eustachian tube, and epistaxis Locally advanced staged juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) traditionally treated with external approaches has been associated with significant morbidities such as blood loss with subsequent blood transfusions, scars, impaired speech, poor swallowing, recurrence an Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a tumor which develops in the nasopharynx of male teenagers and adolescents. According to the MedScape, this tumor can bleed, that's why it is so dangerous. Overall, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare tumor. It accounts for 0.05% of all head tumors. It can develop from the age of 7 till 19

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a vascular tumor that typically occurs in men. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) is a tumor affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. A 38-year-old man with various pigmented lesions and history of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, vestibular schwannoma, and cleft lip and cleft palate is described Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma Purushothaman P K*, Ramakrishnan R*, Kiruthiga Devi M* * Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery, SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, SRM university, SRM nagar, Potheri-603203, Kanchipuram district, Tamilnadu, India Abstract- Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rar

Objective To determine the feasible conditions for exclusive endoscopic resection of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.. Design Retrospective study of 20 patients, with a mean follow-up of 22 months.. Setting Six academic referral hospitals.. Interventions All patients had a preoperative computed tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging scan and at least 1 follow-up computed tomographic. T1 - Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. T2 - Anatomy, pathophysiology and management. AU - Younis, Ramzi T. AU - Abouyared, Marianne. AU - Herman, Björn. AU - Hachem, Ralph Abi. PY - 2015/4/1. Y1 - 2015/4/1. N2 - Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibromas (JNA) are rare tumors found exclusively in adolescent boys Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) Onset most commonly is in the second decade; range is 7-21 years. Mean age at diagnosis is 14 years May regress in late teens but may persist into adulthood Rare in patients older than 25 years. Age Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma or juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor that grows in the back of the nasal cavity, usually found in adolescent boys. Diagnosis If nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is suspected based on physical exam (a smooth submucosal mass in the posterior nasal cavity.

Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is usually encapsulated and composed of vascular tissue and fibrous stroma with coarse or fine collagen fibers. Vessels are thin-walled, lack elastic fibers, have absent or incomplete smooth muscle, and vary in appearance from stellate or staghorn to barely conspicuous because of stromal compression Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a benign disease affecting young males with a propensity to invade intracranially and into the orbit along preformed pathways. Complete surgical excision is the mainstay of management. Patients with multiple recurrences along with tumour extension into skull base and orbit can be considered for external beam radiation as either adjuvant or definitive. Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma of the Nasal Cavity Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma of the Nasal Cavity Stokes, S.; Castle, James 2010-05-13 00:00:00 Head and Neck Pathol (2010) 4:210-213 DOI 10.1007/s12105-010-0181-7 SINE Q U A N ON E R A D I O LO GY -PATH O LO GY Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma of the Nasal Cavity S. Marc Stokes James T. Castle Received: 13 April 2010 / Accepted: 17 April 2010. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a locally aggressive, yet histologically benign, vascular neoplasm. This neoplasm accounts for less than 0.5% of neoplasms of the head and neck and occurs almost exclusively in adolescent males

JUVENILE NASOPHARYNGEAL ANGIOFIBROMA Surgical approachesNasopharynx Adenoid Clinical Features Diagnosis & Treatment

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is the most common benign tumour of the nasopharynx It is usually seen in males in the second decade of life and usually presents with recurrent profuse epistaxis Etiology: Since it occurs in the second decade of life, it is proposed that nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a testosterone dependent tumour A nidus of hamartomatous vascular tissue in [ INTRODUCTION: Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) is a rare benign tumour that occurs almost only in adults and young male patients [1,2,3,4]. It represents 0.05 to 0.5% of all head and neck tumours [5,6]. Incidence in India and Egypt is slightly higher than in USA and Europe Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is difficult to detect early. That's probably because the nasopharynx isn't easy to examine and symptoms of nasopharyngeal carcinoma mimic those of other, more-common conditions. Treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma usually involves radiation therapy, chemotherapy or a combination of the two The management of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma has undergone a significant evolution, with more surgeons moving towards the minimal invasive endoscopic approaches. Although considered the standard of care by most, an endoscopic approach may not be sufficient for extensive tumours, as exemplified by the current case of a young man presenting with the largest juvenile nasopharyngeal. T1 - Giant juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. T2 - Management by skull-base surgery. AU - Donald, Paul J. AU - Enepikedes, Danny. AU - Boggan, James E. PY - 2004/7. Y1 - 2004/7. N2 - From 1977 to 2001, 5 patients were seen with giant angiofibromas that had intracranial penetration